Thursday, August 27, 2009

Schenck - Le Nymphe di Rheno - Les Voix Humaines - 2 Vols (Flac)










Schenck - Le Nymphe di Rheno - Les Voix Humaines - 2 Vols (Flac)
Baroque | Eac, flac, cue | log, cover | 2 CD, 598 MB
January 16, 2001 | Naxos | RapidShare



Johannes Schenck (1660-1712)

Dutch Composer and viol player. It seems that Schenck spent the earlier part of his career in Amsterdam where his compositions included music for a Dutch Singspiel, Bacchus Ceres en Venus, from which songs were published in 1687, as well as works for his own instrument. Enjoying a wide reputation as a performer, in about 1696 he moved to Düsseldorf to the court of the Elector Palatine Johann Wilhelm, known as Jan Wellem, who ruled there from 1679 until his death in 1716, establishing a court that aimed to rival the artistic magnificence of Versailles. Here Schenck served with a group of musicians drawn from various countries. The court opera, which had been seen in Amsterdam, flourished with, among other operas, Kapellmeister Sebastiano Moratelli's Il fabbro pittore, based on the life of the Netherlands painter Quentin Matsys, which had been staged in the Elector's art gallery in 1695. His successor Johann von Wilderer's La monarchia stabilitia was mounted with singular splendour for the visit to Düsseldorf of Carlos III of Spain in 1703. It was to the Elector that Corelli dedicated his concerti grossi and from Düsseldorf that Handel, who visited the court in 1710 and 1711, was able to recruit the famous castrato Baldassari. Other musicians of distinction connected with the Düsseldorf court included briefly the great lutenist Sylvius Weiss, together with his father and brother, while, in 1715, the violinist-composer Veracini performed there.

Schenck is presumed to have continued in the service of the Elector until the latter's death in 1716. Thereafter the electoral court moved to Mannheim, followed by a number of the Düsseldorf musicians, who formed the nucleus of a musical establishment that was to win its own unchallenged reputation, as the century went on.

Doubts as to the date of Schenck's death, presumably in Düsseldorf, come from the lack of any mention of his death in Protestant church records in the city. From this it has been supposed that he may well have become a Catholic, following the religion of his employer, and there are no Catholic records for the probable period of his death. He is mentioned in a document by the court cabinet secretary Rapparini in 1709, but by 1717 his name had disappeared from the list of court opera musicians then compiled.

Vol 1 Tracks:

01 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 1 in B minor - 1. Adagio - Presto - Adagio (02:59)
02 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 1 in B minor - 2. Allemanda: Adagio (03:44)
03 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 1 in B minor - 3. Corrente (02:32)
04 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 1 in B minor - 4. Sarabanda - Variatio (02:58)
05 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 1 in B minor - 5. Giga Vivace (02:40)
06 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 2 in A minor - 1. Allegro (01:47)
07 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 2 in A minor - 2 Allemanda (02:41)
08 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 2 in A minor - 3 Corrente (02:15)
09 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 2 in A minor - 4 Sarabande (02:21)
10 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 2 in A minor - 5 Giga (01:47)
11 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 3 in D major - 1. Adagio (01:41)
12 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 3 in D major - 2. Allegro - Adagio - Allegro (02:49)
13 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 3 in D major - 3. Adagio - Allegro (03:16)
14 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 4 in A major - 1. Ciacona (04:55)
15 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 4 in A major - 2. Bouree (01:03)
16 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 4 in A major - 3. Rondeau (01:06)
17 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 4 in A major - 4. Menuet (01:17)
18 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 5 in F major - 1. Allegro (02:42)
19 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 5 in F major - 2. Adagio (01:57)
20 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 5 in F major - 3. Aria Polonese: Allegro (00:54)
21 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 6 in G minor - 1. Adagio (02:07)
22 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 6 in G minor - 2. Allegro (01:33)
23 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 6 in G minor - 3. Adagio (00:48)
24 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 6 in G minor - 4. Allemanda: Largo (03:42)
25 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 6 in G minor - 5. Corrente (02:07)
26 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 6 in G minor - 6. Sarabanda: Adagio (02:47)
27 - Les Voix Humaines - Sonata No. 6 in G minor - 7. Giga (01:52)

Vol 2 Tracks:
01 - Johannes Schenck - Sonata No. 7 in Bm: 1. Adagio (01:23)
02 - Johannes Schenck - Allegro (01:48)
03 - Johannes Schenck - Adadio con affetto (02:08)
04 - Johannes Schenck - Allegro - Adagio (00:42)
05 - Johannes Schenck - Aria Amoroso: Adagio (03:55)
06 - Johannes Schenck - Sonata No. 8 in Cm: 1. Adagio - Presto - Adagio (03:34)
07 - Johannes Schenck - Allemanda (04:14)
08 - Johannes Schenck - Corrente (02:31)
09 - Johannes Schenck - Sarabanda: Adagio (03:06)
10 - Johannes Schenck - Giga (02:09)
11 - Johannes Schenck - Rondeau (01:50)
12 - Johannes Schenck - Gavotta (01:01)
13 - Johannes Schenck - Menuet (01:19)
14 - Johannes Schenck - Sonata No. 9 in Em: 1. Adagio (03:34)
15 - Johannes Schenck - Aria: Allegro (01:29)
16 - Johannes Schenck - Tempo di Sarabanda: Adagio (02:42)
17 - Johannes Schenck - 4: Giga (01:13)
18 - Johannes Schenck - Bouree (00:56)
19 - Johannes Schenck - Menuet (01:00)
20 - Johannes Schenck - Sonata No. 10 in Gm: 1. Adagio (01:42)
21 - Johannes Schenck - Allemanda (03:05)
22 - Johannes Schenck - Corrente (02:10)
23 - Johannes Schenck - Sarabanda (02:21)
24 - Johannes Schenck - Giga (02:00)
25 - Johannes Schenck - Gavotte (01:06)
26 - Johannes Schenck - Menuet (01:13)
27 - Johannes Schenck - Sonata No. 11 in G: 1. Allegro - Adagio (01:34)
28 - Johannes Schenck - Aria: Allegro (01:29)
29 - Johannes Schenck - Adagio (00:45)
30 - Johannes Schenck - Ciacona (07:19)
31 - Johannes Schenck - Sonata No. 12 in Dm: 1. Allegro - Adagio - Allegro (01:45)
32 - Johannes Schenck - Aria: Allegro (02:02)
33 - Johannes Schenck - Corrente (02:06)
34 - Johannes Schenck - Allegro - Presto (01:51)

Performers
Les Voix Humaines (Susie Napper, Margaret Little)



Les Voix Humaines is a popular instrumental duo of viola da gamba players who specialize in Baroque music, especially works by French Baroque composers. The name "Les Voix Humaines" is taken from a viola da gamba piece by French composer Marin Marais, whose works figure prominently in the repertory of the duo. Although the pair give concerts in which they are the only performers, they also regularly perform with guest artists, like countertenor Daniel Taylor, soprano Suzie LeBlanc, theorbo player Sylvain Bergeron, harpist Maxine Eilander, and lutenist Mike Fentross, as well as other gambists such as Mélisande Corriveau and Jay Bernfeld. While the repertory of Les Voix Humaines focuses greatly on Baroque instrumental music, the duo have performed and recorded much vocal music, particularly with the two singers mentioned above. Those efforts involve a range of repertory that includes works by J.S. Bach, Dowland, Purcell, and many others. The duo have made more than 30 recordings, the bulk of which have appeared the Atma Classique label. They have also recorded for CBC Records, Naxos, Alpha Productions, and Arts Music.

Les Voix Humaines began performing in 1985, establishing their base of operations in Montreal. The players are Susie Napper, who plays a 1703 six-string viola da gamba, and Margaret Little, who plays a seven-string viol, built in 1982 as a copy of a late seventeenth century Colichon viola da gamba.

Over the years the two players have also remained busy performing in other ensembles, Napper in Le Studio de Musique Ancienne de Montréal and Les Boréades de Montréal, and Little in Rebel, Four Nations, and Trinity Consort. Both are teachers, as well, Napper serving on the faculty at McGill University and Little at the University of Montreal. Les Voix Humaines grew to prominence rather quickly, performing regularly throughout Canada and then abroad, with tours in the U.S., Europe, Australia, and Israel. A spate of recordings in the 1990s helped popularize them. Their first Naxos recording, a 1996 collection of viol works by Marais, led to a pair of highly successful double-disc Naxos sets: the first, songs by Hume, and the next, instrumental works by Schenck.

In the new century Les Voix Humaines issued recordings on the Alpha Productions and Arts Music labels. Among their recordings is a 2007 double-CD set, the final volume (No. 4) of the complete Sainte-Colombe collection of (67) Concerts for Viol on Atma Classique.by Robert Cummings Les Voix Humaines is a popular instrumental duo of viola da gamba players who specialize in Baroque music, especially works by French Baroque composers. The name "Les Voix Humaines" is taken from a viola da gamba piece by French composer Marin Marais, whose works figure prominently in the repertory of the duo. Although the pair give concerts in which they are the only performers, they also regularly perform with guest artists, like countertenor Daniel Taylor, soprano Suzie LeBlanc, theorbo player Sylvain Bergeron, harpist Maxine Eilander, and lutenist Mike Fentross, as well as other gambists such as Mélisande Corriveau and Jay Bernfeld. While the repertory of Les Voix Humaines focuses greatly on Baroque instrumental music, the duo have performed and recorded much vocal music, particularly with the two singers mentioned above. Those efforts involve a range of repertory that includes works by J.S. Bach, Dowland, Purcell, and many others. The duo have made more than 30 recordings, the bulk of which have appeared the Atma Classique label. They have also recorded for CBC Records, Naxos, Alpha Productions, and Arts Music.

Les Voix Humaines began performing in 1985, establishing their base of operations in Montreal. The players are Susie Napper, who plays a 1703 six-string viola da gamba, and Margaret Little, who plays a seven-string viol, built in 1982 as a copy of a late seventeenth century Colichon viola da gamba.

Over the years the two players have also remained busy performing in other ensembles, Napper in Le Studio de Musique Ancienne de Montréal and Les Boréades de Montréal, and Little in Rebel, Four Nations, and Trinity Consort. Both are teachers, as well, Napper serving on the faculty at McGill University and Little at the University of Montreal. Les Voix Humaines grew to prominence rather quickly, performing regularly throughout Canada and then abroad, with tours in the U.S., Europe, Australia, and Israel. A spate of recordings in the 1990s helped popularize them. Their first Naxos recording, a 1996 collection of viol works by Marais, led to a pair of highly successful double-disc Naxos sets: the first, songs by Hume, and the next, instrumental works by Schenck.

In the new century Les Voix Humaines issued recordings on the Alpha Productions and Arts Music labels. Among their recordings is a 2007 double-CD set, the final volume (No. 4) of the complete Sainte-Colombe collection of (67) Concerts for Viol on Atma Classique.


6 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  3. Margret and Susie ... the " most better meilleur" viola da gamba duet.
    They're so talented, intelligent, clever with a bow and in mind

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  4. Indeed very accomplished recordings. I have listened to them often over the years...

    ReplyDelete

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